Henry Borden Hydroelectric (18-07-13)

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On Thursday, July 18th, we visited the Henry Borden Hydroelectric plant, which was created in 1926. This system uses height to create gravitational potential energy in order to turn its turbines and create a huge amount of power for its customers. The water also goes in a path that simulates its natural flow. Before coming to the plant, I knew very little about how hydroelectric plants work. During my visit, I was able to see all the parts that contribute to the spinning of the turbines and the archaic technology behind it, as well as the macroscopic view of where the water’s geographic allocation. Hydroelectric power also seems to be catching in Brazil, as the rivers and natural water flow systems are easily adaptable to accommodate the needs of the plants, and have the potential to generate enormous amount of power. Again, this technology is also available in the United States, but is not as widespread as it is in Brazil. If, however, we could increase the quantity of hydroelectric plants in the United States and hook it up to a grid of a national power supplier, I believe that it would work well, as we have plenty of rivers across the continental United States, that could be used if we create some elevation. Of course, natural conservation laws in the United States would prohibit the use of many of these rivers for such usage, or would deny any permit to create a man-made incline to increase the gravitational potential for a hydroelectric source. However, if one ignores the potential for an ecological disaster, there is great profit to be made. The plant harvests energy from a natural input, and requires no maintenance because of the impressive durability of the parts.  

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